Posts Tagged ‘ history ’

A Peephole into the Eastern War – Stormtrooper on the Eastern Front by Mintauts Blosfelds

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Stormtrooper on the Eastern Front: Fighting with Hitler’s Latvian SS

History is the realm of the victors and the losers lose to the winner’s propaganda but I’m interested in the truth behind what really happened rather than the reassuring lies countries often tell themselves.

I have a personal connection to this history story. My grandfather was conscripted into the ranks of the German army and torn away from his 6 month child. So, I know this history well and I feel the book needs some background as it covers a very controversial part of the war.

Blosfelds does a brilliant thing by playing his part in countering the propaganda still surrounding the Baltic state SS units with this publication. They were not a part of the holocaust and were only fighting units. They fought to save their own countries from Russian and German rule and they stood very little chance but they fought on anyway. They were brave men.

On to the book.

The diary entries show the life of a soldier in his unit. This provides an insight into what went on behind the lines as well as the culture of the German army. It is a personal account and, as such, feels more dramatic than a documentary or dry history dates. The boring acts are often brushed over in favour of the more dramatic.

However, the individual it follows did not see much front line action. He was injured a lot and spent a lot of time on trains through Latvia as well as training camps. This has some historical interest as well as the front lines as it shows where training took place and names areas “behind the lines” which are often not mentioned in mainstream history.

As a whole, there is very little documentation of the Latvian SS units from within/personal accounts so this book is very valuable in its existence.

This doesn’t mean I can’t be disappointed. The narrator had a very youthful and naive view of the war. He was easily influenced and seemed to be in it more for the fun and alcohol which jars with post war feeling. He did not fight for his country and looked down upon the older men who were conscripted and didn’t want to fight. Their reasons feel more honourable.

This blights his character for me and makes the read less enjoyable. It is not a fault of the narrator. He was only young and easily influenced but an older narrative could show so much more of the war from so many different viewpoints. It would allow more than the one narrator’s viewpoint to be explored as an older man would be able to see from another’s shoes.

But would I read this again or recommend it to people searching for family in Latvia or looking to find out more about the Eastern front? Despite its cost, yes.

This is a book which details the personal side of the Eastern War. It lives through procedures which can be lost or become boring in pages and pages of dry historical record. It highlights a regiment swept under the carpet or railed against after the war in a neutral, in the moment, light. I only wish there were more accounts like this, and expanding upon this, out there.

But more than anything else, this book gives me a vague idea of what my grandfather went through and why he never spoke about the war.

My rating? 4/5.

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The Inspiration of Myth & “King” Arthur

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The last few months I’ve been reading up on myth and legend. They’ve given me some great ideas for stories but not just as-is. In an altered format, they can create something original and (hopefully) brilliant.

I’ve learnt writers cannot be afraid to change things: this is our job. The world as it comes to us is not always suitable for a retelling – bits may need rearranging, adding, subtracting…but let’s not get into the realm of maths here: we’re creatives after all.

Also, do not be afraid to take a tale like Cinderella or Thumbelina and make it contemporary, change the sex of characters, or setting, or emphasis. If you make this decision in order to create a new story, don’t be afraid to leave it unique!

Put in new names, clothes, etc! Let it be new, let the inspiration, the myth or tale that spawned your story, disappear. It will still be an influence or a starting point but your reader doesn’t necessarily need to know it was for you to have a great story.

As a last little tip to those who want to go further and learn more while they’re at it: unpick the myth. Find the meaning of the names, the places and their significance. Find where or how the myth started, whether it is based on fact or legend or religion.

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I’ve found in my exploration of the King Arthur legends that Arthur was not historical at all but a myth which is first mentioned in welsh poetry. The discovery of these early mentions created a whole new vision of Arthur – a man of the Otherworld, fae, faerie, enchantresses, giants and the supernatural. He is still a hero fighting off bad forces for Britain but these are supernatural rather than historical forces.

Based on this research, I actually have a novel idea in the brewing stages. A novel where Arthur is a crime fighter of the supernatural world, once he is awaken. I’ve bought books on the Celts and Arthur in order for other titbits of Celtic religion and myth to inspire me in this project.

So, I know it sounds kind of boring…but research can be fun! The Arthur research was a mix of documentary-like reading  and old, bard-like tales of the unbeatable warrior.

Some of these old texts are very accessible and actually very enjoyable! I laughed aloud at a few and *may* have found the original inspiration for The Hulk!

Hope this helps those stuck with writer’s block. Anything on the page in a first draft is the first step!

And, as always, feel free to follow me on twitter.

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When I was little I was a vampire and got free sweets. I never thought of death.

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This is me with the scariest eyes I could find. If you want to know how to do the make up then scroll down over the historical bits (if you don’t like them) until you see more pics of yours truly!

We’ve all been that age when, once a year, our parents dress us up in adorable little outfits and take us down the street to collect free food. Once we’re a bit older we may even be let out without an adult escort.

What started off this family tradition? What is the history of Halloween?

Simply put, death. Humanity has been struggling with the concept of death for what seems like eternity. Different cultures and time periods have accepted it with varying degrees of success.

In Britain, for example, 31st October marks Halloween. It’s a festival for spooky outfits, pumpkins and scary tales of ghosts or monsters. But it’s also a day for free sweets (nom!)

However, Halloween was originally “Samhain” and was the start of Gaelic preparations for winter. The Celts must have had some very bad luck around autumn as this is also when much chaos, illness and crop failure was blamed on a thin line between the living and the dead.

Perhaps it was easier for them to explain these catastrophes, and death, through spiritual happenings rather than natural problems. There was no science then, after all. (Though I do acknowledge, and agree, that the spiritual explanation is much more fun).

It is possible that the festival has gained a much livelier, happier air because people in today’s world tend to ignore or put death off in order to function. Many people simply don’t face up to death on a regular basis in the modern world.

Alternatively, it could have become a bit of fun simply because the disasters attributed to the dead are now attributed to the weather or pests, even earthquakes.

However, the old tradition of facing the dead once a year is popular in other countries, too. For example, Mexico has long been known to celebrate The Day of the Dead.
To outsiders they seem to mock death – skull have smiles, are decorated in colourful ways…today sugar skulls are often eaten with the name of a dead relative on them.

Skulls in these countries were historically taken as trophies after battles, skirmishes and wars. They symbolised death and rebirth and kept their significance in later years. After all, aesthetically, the face is what a person is remembered for.

The lighter take on death in Mexico perhaps reflects their beliefs. It is believed that life isn’t the important part of living. The afterlife is the continuation of life and is like waking up after the dream. Therefore, death has a much more positive impact on their lives than in Britain where death is an ending, not a beginning.
Instead, it is a celebration of life, an acceptance of death and a view towards a better future.

I believe that both of these traditions are a way of explaining and dealing with the unexplained as well as gaining closure or positivity from death. The original Samhain and Day of the Dead show the opposite viewpoints on death (positive and negative).

Looking into the history of both has not just encouraged me to explain away their beliefs with scientific, modern solutions but also made me think.

What would it mean for the world if the dead really can communicate? What happens in a world where ghosts can interact with us? Where vampires are real?

These celebrations tap into that inner child in all of us that loves all these ideas and deeply wishes them real.

(A great, non-scary, family friendly movie to demonstrate this would be Halloweentown  ).

To end on a positive note – I hope you all enjoy your halloween – you’re never too old to dress up!

Like I have done! Here’s the first pic. I start by putting some dark black/grey eye shadow around my eyes and some black crayon-y eye-liner in the inner parts to make them less fleshy. Cheers!

Then I paint all my face white apart from the bit around the eyes.

Now I do the bit around the eyes a dark reddy-purple. Messed it up a little bit – not so neat! No true make up artist here!

Next I start outlining with these embellishments. Then colour them in blue, then add silver bits. I also added the nose – outlined an ace of spades and then filled it in. Simple.

  

Now even more outlining on the forehead! And some more blue and silver. 

Then I colour in my lips a terrific bright red and finish up with the black lines around the mouth and colouring in the heart.  The finished shots are the last two from the front and profile.

Here’s a full length shot. Ignore the mess please :).

A rainbow me too because rainbows are awesome 🙂

These were my tools

Any questions? Did you like what I did? Do you have better pictures to show me? Did you even enjoy/like halloween? Be sure to let me know – comment below or message me on twitter.
That’s all for now.

Thanks for reading!

My twitter: https://twitter.com/Holly_emma_Ice

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