When I was little I was a vampire and got free sweets. I never thought of death.

Image

This is me with the scariest eyes I could find. If you want to know how to do the make up then scroll down over the historical bits (if you don’t like them) until you see more pics of yours truly!

We’ve all been that age when, once a year, our parents dress us up in adorable little outfits and take us down the street to collect free food. Once we’re a bit older we may even be let out without an adult escort.

What started off this family tradition? What is the history of Halloween?

Simply put, death. Humanity has been struggling with the concept of death for what seems like eternity. Different cultures and time periods have accepted it with varying degrees of success.

In Britain, for example, 31st October marks Halloween. It’s a festival for spooky outfits, pumpkins and scary tales of ghosts or monsters. But it’s also a day for free sweets (nom!)

However, Halloween was originally “Samhain” and was the start of Gaelic preparations for winter. The Celts must have had some very bad luck around autumn as this is also when much chaos, illness and crop failure was blamed on a thin line between the living and the dead.

Perhaps it was easier for them to explain these catastrophes, and death, through spiritual happenings rather than natural problems. There was no science then, after all. (Though I do acknowledge, and agree, that the spiritual explanation is much more fun).

It is possible that the festival has gained a much livelier, happier air because people in today’s world tend to ignore or put death off in order to function. Many people simply don’t face up to death on a regular basis in the modern world.

Alternatively, it could have become a bit of fun simply because the disasters attributed to the dead are now attributed to the weather or pests, even earthquakes.

However, the old tradition of facing the dead once a year is popular in other countries, too. For example, Mexico has long been known to celebrate The Day of the Dead.
To outsiders they seem to mock death – skull have smiles, are decorated in colourful ways…today sugar skulls are often eaten with the name of a dead relative on them.

Skulls in these countries were historically taken as trophies after battles, skirmishes and wars. They symbolised death and rebirth and kept their significance in later years. After all, aesthetically, the face is what a person is remembered for.

The lighter take on death in Mexico perhaps reflects their beliefs. It is believed that life isn’t the important part of living. The afterlife is the continuation of life and is like waking up after the dream. Therefore, death has a much more positive impact on their lives than in Britain where death is an ending, not a beginning.
Instead, it is a celebration of life, an acceptance of death and a view towards a better future.

I believe that both of these traditions are a way of explaining and dealing with the unexplained as well as gaining closure or positivity from death. The original Samhain and Day of the Dead show the opposite viewpoints on death (positive and negative).

Looking into the history of both has not just encouraged me to explain away their beliefs with scientific, modern solutions but also made me think.

What would it mean for the world if the dead really can communicate? What happens in a world where ghosts can interact with us? Where vampires are real?

These celebrations tap into that inner child in all of us that loves all these ideas and deeply wishes them real.

(A great, non-scary, family friendly movie to demonstrate this would be Halloweentown  ).

To end on a positive note – I hope you all enjoy your halloween – you’re never too old to dress up!

Like I have done! Here’s the first pic. I start by putting some dark black/grey eye shadow around my eyes and some black crayon-y eye-liner in the inner parts to make them less fleshy. Cheers!

Then I paint all my face white apart from the bit around the eyes.

Now I do the bit around the eyes a dark reddy-purple. Messed it up a little bit – not so neat! No true make up artist here!

Next I start outlining with these embellishments. Then colour them in blue, then add silver bits. I also added the nose – outlined an ace of spades and then filled it in. Simple.

  

Now even more outlining on the forehead! And some more blue and silver. 

Then I colour in my lips a terrific bright red and finish up with the black lines around the mouth and colouring in the heart.  The finished shots are the last two from the front and profile.

Here’s a full length shot. Ignore the mess please :).

A rainbow me too because rainbows are awesome 🙂

These were my tools

Any questions? Did you like what I did? Do you have better pictures to show me? Did you even enjoy/like halloween? Be sure to let me know – comment below or message me on twitter.
That’s all for now.

Thanks for reading!

My twitter: https://twitter.com/Holly_emma_Ice

Advertisements
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

crime writing solutions

Offering guidance and advice to writers of crime fiction.

Sally Bosco

Author of Dark Fiction

Damaris Young

Creative writing blog

Simple Pleasures

Visual Poetry, Photography and Quotes

Book Hub, Inc.

The Total Book Experience

Lightning Droplets

Little flecks of inspiration and creativity

adoptingjames

Read our Mission. Find out how you can help us adopt James.

%d bloggers like this: